Handicrafts | Everyday-Life Objects

Object

Object Title
Object Description



A dö

Thread cross (dö, namkha), wood, woollen thread; measurements 43 cm x 26 cm; loan from a private collection
Thread crosses offer residences for deities in »heavenly palaces«.

 
The thread cross
Ritual Cake

Ritual cake of a warrior (magtor), unfired clay, painted; height 38 centimeters; on loan from the Museum für Völkerkunde Wien
Clay replica of a ritual cake which was originally made out of dough. This object was created by a monk in Bumthang. It represents a belligerent deity, as he is used during the yearly ceremonies of worship. In the course of the ceremony, this figure serves as a body for the deity.

 
Village Ritual
Yak Horn

Horn with bone-plate; length 50 centimeters; on loan from the Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich
Yak horns are often placed above the doorways of the house in order to prevent the entrance of malevolent powers. They are also placed on Steinsetztungen/stone markers in the landscape, which is indicative of the ancient pre-Buddhist practices of making offerings to the nature deities. Often sacred Buddhist formulas are inscribed on yak horns, whose ritual use and symbolic worth dates back to pre-Buddhist times, as in this case with the inscription »O mani padme hum«.

 
The Laya in the North
Butter in Pigskin

Butter; length 48 centimeters, diameter 23 centimeters; on loan from the Museum für Völkerkunde Wien
10 to 15 kilograms butter are sewn into pigskin for storage or for transport. This way, butter can be preserved for a very long time.

 
Yak, the Source of Life
Yak Jewelry

Yak hair, dyed; length 48 centimeters, diameter 17 centimeters; on loan from the Museum für Völkerkunde Wien
Tufts of hair, dyed red, are woven into mane and tail of one of the animals of the herd, thus marking its consecration to the mountain deity.

 
Yak, the Source of Life
Butter-Tea Churn and Wooden Container

Butter-Tea Churn, wood; height 106 centimeters, diameter 19 centimeters; on loan from Françoise Pommaret
Unfermented tea leaves are boiled, the tea is poured into the churn and mixed with butter, salt and soda.
Container, wood; height 40 centimeters, diameter 30 centimeters; on loan from Françoise Pommaret
The thin bands of wood are held together by seams made out of bamboo strips.

 
The East of Bhutan
Boxes

Bamboo; measurements 8 x 20 x 10 centimeters and height 8 centimeters, diameter 17 centimeters; on loan from the Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich and the Museum für Völkerkunde Wien respectively.
Boxes made out of bamboo strips or thin wooden bands are used primarily in the kitchen for food storage.

 
The East of Bhutan
Spinning Wheel

Wood, bamboo, iron; measurements 41 x 43,5 x 32,5 centimeters; on loan from the Museum für Völkerkunde Wien
Almost every household produces wool. Only women work with this kind of spinning wheel, however, with the hand spindle, the men may also work.

 
The Brokpa
Ladle

Wood; measurements: length 52 centimeters, diameter 10 centimeters and length 45,5 centimeters, diameter 11 centimeters and length 38,5 centimeters, diameter 8,5 centimeters; on loan from Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich

 
The Sub-Tropical South
Rain Protection

Bamboo, bark; measurements 104,5 x 51 centimeters; on loan from the Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich
In the rainy south, farmers, while working in the fields, wear rain protection of this kind which is unfolded and then worn over their backs. Thin layers of bark are supported by basketwork made of bamboo.

 
The Nepalese
Butter Churn

Body: wood; clip: iron; insert used for repair: aluminium; height 74 centimeters, diameter 28 centimeters; on loan from the Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich
The whisk is spun within the churn producing butter flakes. This churn is used by the Nepalese minority in the country.

 
The Nepalese
Sickle in a Sheath

Wood, iron; sickle: length 24 centimeters; sheath: measurements 4,5 x 15,5 x 17 centimeters, diameter 12,5 centimeters; on loan from the Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich
Women of Nepalese origin wear sickles not only while working in the fields, they are also considered part of their costume. The sickles are worn on their hips in artfully carved sheaths.

 
The Nepalese
Field-drag

Wood; length 240 centimeters; on loan from the Museum für Völkerkunde Wien
The field-drag is pulled over the field by an animal in order to flatten the clods of earth after plowing. The farmer stands on this implement, thus providing the necessary downward pressure.

 
West and Central Bhutan
Noodle Maker and Noodle Sieve

Machine for noodle making: wood frame, insert with holes in the dough compartment: horn; measurements 53 x 88 x 13 centimeters; on loan from the Museum für Völkerkunde Wien
Noodles are made out of buckwheat flour.
Sieve: wood, bamboo; measurements 6 x 72 x 13 centimeters; on loan from the Museum für Völkerkunde Wien
This is used to take the cooked noodles out of the pot.

 
The Bumthang Province
Tea Sieve

Bamboo; measurements: 16 x 30,5 x 11,5 centimeters or 17 x 27 centimeters; on loan from the Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich

 
The Village Household
Mortar and Pestle

Wood, stone; height 21 centimeters, diameter 14,5 centimeters; on loan from Christof und Marie-Noel Frei-Pont
Mortars of this type are primarily used for the grinding of spices, especially for chiles.

 
The Village Household
»Good-Luck Chest« (Yang Gam)

Wood, multi-colored fabric covering, iron fittings; measurements 19 x 28,5 x 13,5 centimeters; on loan from Helga Paul
In order to symbolically maintain good luck in the house, coins, seeds, jewels, semi-precious stones and much more are kept in a chest in the altar room of the house.

 
The Farm House
Ladle

Wood; measurements: length 29,5 centimeters, diameter 7,5 centimeters and length 31,5 centimeters, diameter 8 centimeters and length 34,5 centimeters, diameter 7 centimeters; on loan from the Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich

 
The Farm House
Double-Sided Drum (Damaru)

Bone, snakeskin, silver, silk, silk velvet, cotton, imitation coral; measurement of the drum base 9 x 6,5 centimeters; on loan from a private collection
Hand drums, which are beaten on both sides, symbolize the simultaenous existence of both the relative and the absolute truth. They accompany the Lama in his meditation, please the gods' ears or call for the deities in ritual.

 
The Farm House
Ritual Dagger

Bone; length 27 centimeters, on loan from a private collection
Ritual daggers, carved entirely out of bone, are kept mainly on the altar as decorative objects or are used in secret rites.

 
The Farm House



The Vienna Exhibition
Handicrafts
.  Wood and Slate Carving
.  Painting
.  Papermaking
.  Bronze Casting
.  Wood Turning
.  Carpentry
.  Hand Forging
.  Masonry
.  Bamboo and Cane Work
.  Weaving
.  Sewing
.  Metal-Work
.  Pottery
.  Imported Objects
.  Everyday-Life Objects


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